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A LETTER TO MY FAVORITE TEACHER

pam_general[2]

Dear Mrs. Davis,

You were my second grade teacher at Arapaho Elementary School in Richardson, Texas. The year, 1965.  I really don’t remember much about what you taught me, outside of the Planets Song, but I remember how you made me feel…Loved.  You were old, plump, and wore horn-rimmed glasses.  Chances are, you have passed away, but as another school year looms on the horizon, I want to let you know how much you helped me through a difficult time with your simple kindnesses.  I have never forgotten.

In April of 1966, when my daddy unexpectedly died of a heart attack, I missed two weeks of school.  My mother and I travelled to Alabama to join the rest of my family to bury my daddy.  When we returned home, I was nervous about returning to school.  I felt like I had a big neon sign over my head that flashed “My daddy died! My daddy died!” and worried about how my classmates were going to treat me.  Would thelove is a special way of feelingy ask me questions? Would they avoid me like I had the plague?  But you eased my fears by giving me a book, “Love is a Special Way of Feeling”, by Joan Walsh Anglund.  Inside the cover, you wrote in most excellent print, “We love you, Pam.”  Underneath your name were the printed signatures (after all, we hadn’t learned cursive yet) of my 24 classmates.  Receiving this book before I returned to school let me know that I was welcome and I was loved.  You have no idea how much that simple gesture made me feel. Even though my classmates may not have fully understood what was going on, having their signatures in the book under the comment “we love you” was, well, incredible.

The last month of school was good, but as a result of my daddy’s death, you knew I was moving to Alabama at the end of the school year.  On the last day of school, as we all cleaned out our desks and said our goodbyes, you gave me my second gift, a going away present.  Right before I left, you handed me a worn copy of “The Miracle Worker” by William Gibson.  You told me that it was your son’s book but you wanted me to have it because I was moving to the state where this amazing woman and her teacher lived, where this beautiful story of strength and courage took place.  It was several years before I was able to read the book but knowing that it meant a lot to you made me look forward to reading it. 

I suspect you repeated this type of gesture numerous times throughout your career for a variety of reasons due to student needs.  But that never entered my mind.  What entered my mind is that I was loved by you at a time when I needed to feel loved.  I have never forgotten, and I am still grateful.

I love you,

Pam

Here is a free handout, TEN TIPS FOR TEACHERS: SUPPORTING A GRIEVING STUDENT, that is useful for classroom teachers, guidance counselors, and school psychologists.

When one door of happiness closes, another opens,

but often we look so long at the closed door that we

do not see the one that has been opened up for us.

Helen Keller

 

THE RIPPLE EFFECT: A Strategy for Analyzing Conflicts

The School Psychologist

rip·ple ef·fect (n.): The continuing and spreading results of an event or action. www.oxforddictionaries.com

A simple technique I frequently use with students is the “Ripple Effect” strategy. Often, I work with students who are impulsive in their decisions, resistant to authority, quick to anger, or easily baited by peers to say or do something inappropriate. The “Ripple Effect” strategy helps students systematically and visually dissect what happened and readily shows them where in the unfolding of the situation they could have said or done something differently, resulting in a more favorable outcome. While it’s too late to undo what has already happened, this strategy shows students how their behavior affects others and how others’ behavior affects them, causing the ripples to grow wider and wider, like ripples that spread outward when a rock is thrown in water. The hope is that by processing a conflict that has already occurred, a future conflict can be avoided or, at the least, minimized.  Additionally, this strategy helps the student identify her role in the conflict, thereby assuming responsibility for her actions/words and recognizing how they contributed to the conflict.

Here’s how it works.

I begin by listening to what happened. Oftentimes, the student shares the story from what she perceives is the beginning but what, in reality, is several steps into the event. It usually requires some questioning to get to the actual “beginning” of the story. Once the story is shared, I ask the student if she has ever thrown a rock into a pond, and if so, what happened. This leads to a short conversation about the ripples the rock creates in the water. I explain that we are going to use the idea of ripples in water to discuss what happened to her, and we plug the situation into the “Ripple Effect” worksheet.ripple effect

I then point out how the ripple grew from one to two to three to however many ripples because there was an INTERACTION going on between the student and someone else. Typically with every other “ripple”, the student had a choice in causing the ripples to grow (the conflict escalates) or stopping the ripples from increasing (the conflict stops). As we process each ripple, we write out what was said or done at that point.  Once all the ripples are created based on the conflict being processed, I ask the student, “During which of the ripples were you saying or doing something?” We circle all of the instances that were student’s actions or words.  I then systematically ask the student what she could have said or done differently at each of these circled points which may have stopped the ripple from growing.  In other words, what could she have said or done that would have been more appropriate?  Students typically are very good at identifying more appropriate choices once they are calm and removed from the conflict.

Another key point to make when using this strategy is to help the student realize that she only has control of some of the ripples (typically, but not always, every other ripple).  Most conflicts fall into an action/reaction category. The first ripple is the action, the second ripple is a reaction to the first, and the third ripple is a reaction to the second, and so forth.  Although she only creates the first and third ripples, her actions are fueling the reactions from others.  IF she says or does something that reduces the chance of the problem escalating, the other person may still add a ripple (i.e., say or do something to make the situation worse), but it is less likely.

When we are finished filling out the worksheet, the student is able to keep the worksheet as a visual reminder of the process as well as share it with her parents or teacher.

If you are interested in using the “Ripple Effect” strategy and would like clear instructions, several user-friendly worksheets, and a few scenarios illustrating its implementation, wait no longer! I have, for years, drawn concentric circles on scrap paper, which works in an informal way, and truthfully, it would for you. But, if you want a more comprehensive, sequential way to use this strategy that includes all the “bells and whistles” my scrap paper circles lacked, here it is: The Ripple Effect Strategy—A Strategy for Analyzing Conflicts.

 

 

 

YOU SCRATCH MY BACK, I’LL SCRATCH YOURS: The Give and Take in Relationships

pam_general[2]

balance pictureWith the approach of Valentine’s Day, a very busy day for counselors due to broken or lonely hearts, I thought it would be worthwhile to consider the importance of practicing reciprocity, the ability to give to and receive from others.  The ability to give and take in a balanced manner will pay off large dividends in all types of relationships, be it friendships, parent-child, dating relationships, spouses and even co-workers who share a very small office…right, Eva?

Let’s look at reciprocity using the familiar saying, “You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours”.  Growing up it was a fairly common practice for my siblings and me to tickle each other’s backs when we were on long road trips in the car.  And, you can be sure of one thing, there was an equal amount of giving/taking going on. No one was going to receive a back tickle without giving equally back to the giver.  Not if they ever wanted a turn of receiving again! We were even known to use our watches or number of songs played on the radio to be as “fair” as possible. Without a perceived balance, back-tickling would have been abandoned, likely after arguing.

So, what are the possible variations to this quote? Really, there are three:

  • You Scratch My Back, I’ll Scratch Yours—two people in a relationship who want to have a mutual, balanced amount of give/take.  It may not always be 50/50. In fact, that is unlikely. But there is clear evidence of each person giving and receiving in an equitable way. Typically, both people in this relationship are content with the relationship. This relationship has a good chance of enduring over time and providing both people with happiness and satisfaction.
  • You Scratch My Back, I Won’t Scratch Yours—two people in a relationship wherein one is a giver but not a receiver and one is a receiver but not a giver.  This relationship is vulnerable because while the receiver typically remains satisfied, the giver may struggle with feeling unappreciated. The relationship may start out okay but gradually becomes problematic as the giver’s needs for nurturance and attention go unmet or met at a very low level.
  • You Won’t Scratch My Back, I Won’t Scratch Yours—two people in a relationship where neither gives and both take.  But, what is there to take? Neither is giving. So, while this might work in the short-term, this relationship is set up for failure. These relationships tend to be volatile because although each person is not giving, both likely want to receive. Therein lies the tension. Indifference, frustration, anger and resentment brew.

To point out the importance of balancing the act of giving/receiving, whether it be back rubs or sharing a quality conversation or anything, really, I use a great activity that leads to lots of discussion by the participants. This activity is good for intermediate elementary, middle school, high school, and college students.  Adults in a group setting would also find it revealing.  Click the following link if you are interested in previewing the whole-class or small-group activity:  YOU SCRATCH MY BACK, I’LL SCRATCH YOURS: The Give and Take in Relationships

A New Take On An Old Song–Counseling Strategy

If You WANT To Be Happy And You Know It

“If you want to be happy and you know it, clap your hands!” Clap. Clap.

“If you want to be happy and you know it, clap your hands!” Clap. Clap.

“If you want to be happy and you know it then make sure your face will show it,

If you want to be happy and you know it, clap your hands!”

Okay, this is a challenging concept to digest and an even more challenging concept to PRACTICE when a person is not happy.  After all, if someone is sad, the last thing he or she wants to do is smile and “act” happy.  Yet, research has shown over and over again that when a sad person forces a smile on her face, it will, in fact, help her feel better.  How?  First, a person’s brain registers the smile and releases endorphins and serotonin, both which elevate mood.  Secondly, there’s the effect a person’s smile has on her interaction with others. Instead of someone approaching her with a frown and asking “What’s wrong?” and thereby perpetuating the negative emotion, others will likely respond to her smile with more favorable, positive comments.  So, with this in mind, I have told students of all ages who want to feel happier to force a smile.  “If you want to be happy and you know it then make sure your face will show it…”

So, let’s consider the other modified line to this classic children’s song, “If you want to be happy and you know it, clap your hands!”  This is slightly different than the line about making sure your face shows it. How so? This directive in the song is not so much telling a person how to look, it is telling him or her how to act.  Changing what we are doing can have a direct positive impact on how we feel.  When counseling students, we often ask them, “Do you want to feel better? If so, DO something differently.  Stop doing behaviors that perpetuate feeling badly. Stop listening to sad music. Stop talking with others about how bad things are. Stop overeating.  Start doing behaviors that encourage feeling better. Get up. Get moving. Get busy distracting yourself from your troubles and worries. Help someone else. Count the blessings you DO have.”  The list of possible mood-lifting actions is a long one.

Now, having said all of this, I realize that sometimes feeling SAD is exactly the right feeling for a particular moment. I am not saying no one should ever feel sad. That’s absurd. But, what I am saying is that if a student seeks out support because he or she wants to feel happier, two steps you can encourage the student to take are: 1) smiling, and 2) doing something that will get his or her mind off feeling badly.  So, get them clapping!  Clap. Clap.

If you are interested in a student handout and overview of this lesson, you can download it at TEACHERS pay TEACHERS by clicking this link:  If You Want To Be Happy & You Know It.

*If you suspect a student may be clinically depressed, it is important to inform parents and share information regarding additional resources to assist them in providing their child with appropriate supports and services.

 

COUNSELING NOTES: What Did I Do Yesterday?

Counseling notes 4

Any counselor that works in an educational setting—elementary, middle, or high, private or public—and has worked for more than one day knows that a schedule should be written in pencil.  There will be interruptions. There will be unexpected crises. The one constant is that the day’s scheduled events will change.  Many days our door seems to be revolving with a variety of student needs.  “My boyfriend broke up with me between classes!”  “She invited all the other girls to her birthday party, but she didn’t invite me.”    “Every time I take a test, I feel like I’m going to throw up!”  And then there are the BIG DEAL issues that come through the door as often as those that might appear trivial.  “My dad threatened to kill my mom last night.”  “My friend showed me her arms, and she has cuts on them.”  “My mom left us last night.”  “I want to run away from home.”

There have been days when I have provided counseling services, large and small, to no fewer than a dozen students.  These are exhausting days, with a pizza delivered to my home and a long hot bath in my future that night.

When it is time to document all of these contacts in a quick, effective, way, I use COUNSELING NOTES. LuAnne, another Square Peg, developed this format using Microsoft’s Excel Pivot Tables.  She designed it, and I have implemented its use for the past four years by keeping my counseling notes using this terrific program. You get to decide how simple you want it to be based on the amount of detail you put in the “Comments” section.   Best of all, it tracks the number of contacts you have by date AND by student. I print it out at the end of each year both ways, alphabetically and chronologically.  I can quickly see that I saw “John Doe” 11 times when referring to the alphabetical printout.  I can easily find that I counseled 47 students during September when I arrange it chronologically.  And, there’s MORE! At the end of the year (or whenever desired), pivot tables allow me to see how many students I have seen by counseling category (family problems, anger management, social skills instruction, grief, etc.), the school or grade level with the greatest need for my support that particular year, and how many consultations I provided.  Separate graphs and charts quickly show this information in such a way that I see my counseling services during the school year.  It is much more than a spreadsheet!

In a nutshell, this tool allows me to keep sole-possession counseling notes in a quick, simple manner AND is excellent documentation of my time…proving time and time again that I am a needed member of my school community.  It is not unusual for me to have 400+ student contacts across an academic year.  Using COUNSELING NOTES keeps my counseling notes organized in a way I have never previously been able to accomplish.  I am NOT, by nature, an organized person (ask anyone who works or lives with me!), and this is simply the best tool for counselors I have ever personally used.  Want to prove your worth in a statistical, data-driven way?  Use COUNSELING NOTES.

Remember, there are legal and ethical guidelines when keeping counseling notes as they relate to student records.  See my post STUDENT RECORDS: Yours, Mine or Ours?

Counseling notes 2

Counseling notes 3 Counseling notes 1

STUDENT RECORDS: Yours, Mine or Ours?

pam_general[2]

I work daily with a great team of seven guidance counselors and four school psychologists.  Each is highly skilled.  It is not unusual for us to discuss, or even debate, a variety of counseling issues.  One that resurfaces on a fairly routine basis is the issue of student records, particularly concerning our COUNSELING NOTES.   I’d like to take a minute to quickly review what the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) recommends regarding our records on students:

  1.  First and foremost, make sure you are keeping educational records that are required by your school board policies, as well as state and federal laws/regulations.  This extends beyond counseling notes and refers to all student records.  Be familiar with FERPA (Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, 1974) and how this impacts educational records.
  2.  Keep your counseling notes, referred to by ASCA as sole-possession records, separate from educational records, per state laws on this issue.
  3.  Remember that sole-possession records are designed to be a way for you, the counselor, to remember your sessions with students (e.g., what the topic of discussion was,  what strategies for coping may have been taught, what the student’s reason for seeking support was, what day you saw the student, etc.).  Here are potential limitations to sole-possession counseling notes:
  • Even though they are not typically part of the student’s educational records, they could become so if shared with others or if they are available to others in written or verbal form.  So, keep your counseling notes private, period.
  • Sole-possession records could also become part of a student’s educational records if they include information beyond your professional opinion or personal observations.
  • Likewise, be advised that individual student notes can possibly be subpoenaed.  What you are required to disclose may depend on your state laws, your credentials, and the situation-at-hand so it is advisable to consult with your school board’s attorney if subpoenaed.

Bottom line, your sole-possession counseling notes are for YOUR EYES ONLY.  Keeping these notes in a confidential, secure location and keeping them only for your individual reference in order to document student contacts by date, name, and reason, is paramount in protecting your counseling notes from becoming public.   My rule of thumb is that I create these notes with the expectation that they will stay private but with the knowledge that they COULD become public. Thus, I only put information in my counseling notes that I am comfortable having someone else know should that happen.

Following are two excellent articles by ASCA that further discuss counseling notes:

http://www.ascaschoolcounselor.org/article_content.asp?edition=91&section=140&article=1273

http://www.schoolcounselor.org/content.asp?contentid=688

The American School Counselor Association’s Code of Ethics is found at:

http://www.schoolcounselor.org/files/EthicalStandards2010.pdf

Quick & Easy Functional Behavior Assessment

FBA1

There’s a reason for every student’s behavior! Jack has not “lost his mind”. Jill is not “trying to drive you crazy”. He or she is trying to get something or avoid something. Now you have to be the detective and figure out what it is. Many teachers overlook this detective step and skip to a quick fix.

Imagine if you went to the doctor and complained of pain in your arm and the doctor just said to take some ibuprofen. Well, if your arm is broken, that ibuprofen will not work. This is the same thing for student behavior. If a student is not doing his school work, you may send him to time out. If he is avoiding doing school work because he doesn’t understand it, your discipline will not fix the problem. It is actually helping the student avoid work.

I call this a Quick & Easy Functional Behavior Assessment because it just takes a few minutes to do. This is not a formal assessment many specialists prefer. It’s for the classroom teacher who has to deal with tough behaviors all the time.

One of my favorite encounters with a 3rd grade teacher was when she stopped me in the hallway and explained a problem she was having with a student. Before I could say a thing, she went on to quickly analyze his behavior. She specifically described his behavior, said he acted out at specific times, she thought he was doing it because ____, and thought she could take care of the problem by ____. She then thanked me for the help! I said, “You’re welcome!” and smiled all the way to my classroom. She did a Quick & Easy Functional Behavior Assessment right there in the hallway in less than 5 minutes!

Let’s get started! Download Quick & Easy Functional Behavior Assessment Teacher Reflection. Use this list to help you analyze what is going on.

In the next few days, I will show you how to use this Quick & Easy Functional Behavior Assessment and turn it into a behavior intervention plan.

See you soon, LuAnne

 

Counseling CHATS

chats logo

Over the years, one thing I’ve learned is that a friendly chat, a few words of encouragement, or a five-minute “touching base with” conversation can go a LONG way with students. It is rewarding to see the appreciation in students’ faces when you take a little time to intentionally talk with them individually, genuinely asking how they’ve been.

In counseling, we are taught that our counseling sessions with students should be a minimum of 30 minutes, perhaps longer for teens. In a school setting, this creates multiple issues… missed instruction for students and a reduction in the amount of students a counselor is able to help in a given day. While there are certainly situations when students need significant time to meet with the counselor, the use of “counseling chats” is a strategy I find beneficial, and they’re fun!

Sometimes my “chats” are planned—I set aside an hour or two to run anywhere from 5-10 students through my office (or perhaps we stand outside their classroom or sit outside on a bench on a pretty day).  If the chat has been fairly benign and problem-free (always a good thing!), I give the student a chance to bring up a potential issue towards the end by saying “It’s been great catching up with you. Before you go back to class, is there anything bothering you that you want to talk with me about?”  Sometimes this results in our “chat” turning into a counseling session.  Most often this is not the case, but either way, it clearly sends the message to the student that I continue to be available as a resource if something were to arise.

I find that counseling chats:

  • show students you continue to care and are genuinely interested in them,
  • allow you to follow-up with many more students,
  • give you time to work with new students in crisis while still keeping up with previous student-clients,
  • allow students to continue receiving tidbits of counseling information,
  • remind students that there is at least one adult who cares about them in a meaningful way,
  • remind students that I am always available.

Personally, I find that counseling chats fire me up. They are motivational as a counselor because they give me a chance to interact with students who were previously in distress under more favorable circumstances. We get to “debrief” and celebrate success and improvement.  CHATS are prevention and an excellent way to stay connected with students, even after problems have been resolved.  If you are interested in being more intentional in having CHATS with your students this year, here is a free handout that reviews the basic components and a mini-poster that serves as a visual reminder to do CHATS throughout the year.

About THE THREE SQUARE PEGS

Pegs with schoolhouse

One School Nurse + One Behavior Specialist + One School Psychologist =

The Untested ESSENTIALS of Learning

A square peg in a round hole is an idiomatic expression which describes the unusual individualist who could not fit into a niche of his or her society.[1] ^ Wallace, Irving. (1957) The Square Pegs: Some Americans Who Dared to be Different, p. 10.

Above found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_peg_in_a_round_hole

 Most employees of school districts are… [insert a drum roll here]…teachers.  And the customers of their expertise are the wonderful students who walk through the doors of their respective schools each day, ready to learn all the fascinating things teachers have prepared to teach.

[Insert the sound of screeching brakes] Hold on a minute!

What happens if a student walks through the doors of the school and is not 100% ready to learn? What if the student is not even 50% ready to learn? What if the student is hungry? Sleep deprived? Scared because yesterday another student threatened to beat him up? Worried because her mother’s boyfriend threw her mother around the kitchen last night? Angry because her family’s electricity was turned off the night before? Sad because his grandfather is dying? What if the student, himself, is sick? Or has a learning disability? Or has attention span issues? Or…well, you get the point.  The list of hypotheticals is endless.

In an average day in a classroom of 25 students, there are probably at least 5-6 students who have some sort of barrier that interferes with his or her ability to learn academics optimally.  That’s where we come in…The 3 Square Pegs. Our jobs are to provide support services to students, their families, and the teaching staff so that teachers are able to teach, and more importantly, students are able to maximize learning.

What can you expect from our blog? Our focus will be on the multitude of untested essentials that are required for learning to occur.  Head lice? Check. Classroom design? Check. Bully Prevention? Check. De-escalation strategies? Check. And on and on the list goes. These essentials will be in the form of a host of practices at the district, school, classroom, and individual student levels.  With our 60+ years of collective experience in helping teachers teach and students learn, we think we have something to offer.

We are blessed to work in a school district that has vision. To be a small, rural school district with approximately 2,600 students, having a Nurse Practitioner designated as the district’s Director of the Coordinated School Health Program, a School Psychologist functioning as a district-wide counselor to support our excellent guidance counselors, and a Behavior Consultant who is currently the Director of our Alternative Education Program, we consider ourselves rather unique.

Per the meaning of “A square peg in a round hole”, we are unusual individualists who do not fit into a niche of our society (aka, schools). Don’t confuse our “not fitting neatly into our educational society” as meaning that we are not wanted there or that we don’t want to be there! We are welcomed and appreciated by the educators with whom we have the privilege of working. We just happen to think differently in some respects. While we all want the best for our students, our focus is on the many foundational essentials required for learning to even be an option.  Teachers teach.  They are under tremendous pressure to improve achievement and adhere to new national standards. The three of us provide support services, direct and indirect, to our district’s excellent teachers and awesome students. The result? Students who, for the most part, come to school happy, healthy, and ready to learn.  Not BECAUSE of us, but with our help, these students achieve more academic, behavioral, and social/emotional success.

What can you expect in the days and weeks to come? The format of our blog, while it has the common thread of addressing barriers to learning, will shift as each of us take on the responsibility of writing one or two blog entries per week.